tsJensen

A quest for software excellence...

Hopper<T>: Queue<T> Class in C# that Caches to Disk

In a recent project, I had a Windows Service that was receiving many thousands of requests which could only be processed at specific intervals. Soon I found that queuing so many requests in a simple Queue<T> class ran away with all my machine's memory.

So what to do?

I didn't really want to change my code. I like the Queue<T> class. So I wrote a class I call Hopper<T> which acts like Queue<T> but caches items to disk. It's constructor gives the class the information it needs to do all the work. Then you just use it like a Queue<T>.

public Hopper(
 
string cachePath,
 
string uniqueFileExtension,
 
int hopperCapacity,
 
int reorderLevel)

This class takes advantage of the System.Runtime.Serialization and the System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary namespaces.

Download the code and give it a try. And be sure to let me know what you think.

Hopper.zip (2.74 KB)

Parsing HTML with C# by the Book (DTD)

Recently I had to write an HTML parser for a project I've been working on for some time now. First I tried translating an open source C++ parser but it really wasn't what I wanted and it was also under the GPL. After contacting the author and realizing (or re-remembering) that I could not use a GPL derivative in a commercial library or application, I scrapped that and went back to the source: the official HTML DTD.

Re-remembering how to read a DTD after not having done so for so long was a chore, but the folks at Autistic Cuckoo helped. So I found a very helpful tutorial. I spent the next day or two writing the code in the file you linked below. I took some inspiration from a few files I found while browsing the FireFox code under the Mozilla license. The rest of it came from studying the DTD and trying to figure out a way to encapsulate that in a usable object model.

Here's an example of how to use it:

HtmlDocument doc = new HtmlDocument(url, html);
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
Collection<HtmlTag> pcdata = doc.GetList(DtdElement.A);
foreach (HtmlTag tag in pcdata)
{
  if (!tag.EndTag)
  {
    Dictionary<string, string> attributes = doc.GetAttributes(tag);
    sb.AppendLine("");
    sb.AppendLine("A: " + doc.ReadSlice(tag.Slice));

    foreach (KeyValuePair<string, string> pair in attributes)
    {
      sb.AppendLine(" " + pair.Key + "=" + pair.Value);
    }
  }
}

I'm releasing it under the BSD license, which I like much more than the GPL as I'm not really a "true" free software zealot. The only think I ask is that if you fix a bug or make an improvement, please share it with me and I'll put up a new version here.  

NetBrick.Net.OpenUtils1.zip (35.31 KB)