tsJensen

A quest for software excellence...

Small and Simple: The Keys to Enterprise Software Success

Someone once said, “By small and simple things are great things brought to pass.” The context was certainly not enterprise software development but I have come to believe that these words are profound in this context as well.

Every enterprise, medium and large, is challenged with complexity. Their systems and businesses are complex. Their politics and personnel and departments are complex. Their business models and markets and product lines are complex.

And their software is complex. But why?

Because we make it complex. We accept the notion that one application must accomplish all the wants and wishes of the management for whom we work, either because we are afraid to say, “This is a bad idea,” or because we are arrogant enough to think we’re up to the challenge. So we create large teams and build complex, confusing and unmanageable software that eventually fulfills those wants and wishes, sometimes years later—that is, if the project is not cancelled because the same management team loses patience and/or budget to see it through.

Some companies have made a very large business from selling such very large and complex software. They sell it for a very large “enterprise class” price to a business who wants all those nice shiny features but doesn’t want to take the risk of building it for themselves. And then they buy the very large enterprise software system and find that they must spend the next six to twenty months configuring and customizing the software or changing their own business processes and rules to fit the strictures of the software they have purchased.

The most successful enterprise projects I’ve worked on have all shared certain qualities. These projects have produced workable, usable and nearly trouble-free service all because they shared these qualities. The are:

  • A small team consisting of:
    • A senior lead developer or architect
    • Two mid-senior level developers
    • A project manager (part time)
    • And a strong product owner (part time)
  • A short but intense requirements gathering and design period with earnest customer involvement.
  • Regular interaction with product owner with a demo of the software every week.
  • Strong communication and coordination by the project manager, assuring the team and the customer understands all aspects of project status and progress.

The challenge in the enterprise is to find the will and means to take the more successful approach of “small and simple.”

You may say, “Well, that’s all fine and good in some perfect world, but we have real, hard and complex problems to solve with our software.” And that may be true. Software, no matter how good, cannot remove the complexity from the enterprise. But there is, in my opinion, no reason that software should add to it.

The real genius of any enterprise software architect, if she has any genius at all, is to find a way to break down complex business processes and systems into singular application parts that can be built by small, agile teams like I’ve described, and where necessary, to carefully define and control the service and API boundaries between them.

Must a single web application provide every user with every function and feature they might need? No. But we often try for that nirvana and we often fail or take so long to deliver that delivery does not feel like success.

Must a single database contain all the data that the enterprise will need to perform a certain business function or fulfill a specific book of business? No. But we often work toward that goal, ending up with a database that is so complex and so flawed that we cannot hope to maintain or understand it without continuous and never ending vigilance.

When your project complexity grows, your team grows, your communication challenges grow and your requirements become unwieldy and unknowable. When you take on the complex all in one with an army, you cannot sufficiently focus your energy and your strength and collectively you will accomplish less and less with each addition to your team until your project is awash is cost and time overruns, the entire team collectively marching to delivery or cancellation. And in the end either outcome, delivery or cancellation, feels the same.

By small and simple things, great enterprise software can be brought to pass. Sooner rather than later. Delivering solid, workable, maintainable, supportable solutions. Put one small thing together with another, win the war on complexity and provide real value to your management team. Do this again and again and you’ll have a team that will never want another job because they will have become all too familiar with real success.