tsJensen

A quest for software excellence...

Be a Better Technology Manager

While browsing the deep space of Alpha Quadrant of the web this evening, I ran into a Forbes article entitled, 6 Fundamentals That Can Make You A Better Manager In 2014 by Victor Lipman. I enjoyed the brief article so much, I decided to refactor it into my own words for the manager we either want to be or want to have.

In our agile quest to improve our software and our processes, we may sometimes overlook the nuances of management. In shops with empowered agile teams, it is possible for managers to make management an afterthought, allowing the self-organizing teams to pick up the slack. It is my opinion that this false sense of security and resulting dip in the quality of management can lead to fundamental and long term organizational and cultural debt.

To avoid accumulating this management debt, team members should encourage, perhaps even require, the following from their managers. And certainly managers should strive to focus on these fundamentals even while riding on the success of an empowered, agile development team.

  1. Be open to suggestion. Seek out and embrace ideas and opportunities to improve your management practices. Be a good listener. Take regular one-on-one’s with your direct reports. Conduct “town hall” meetings with your direct reports and their teams. Encourage honest and open feedback. Don’t allow the “way it’s always been done” to overshadow your improvement courage.
  2. Expect excellence and reward it. Set high but attainable expectations. Communicate them clearly. Be gentle but firm and require regular accountability and reporting. Openly recognize and praise success. Privately discuss under-performance and obtain solid commitments to improve from under performing members of your team.
  3. Use your time effectively and efficiently. Be generous but measured with your time. Spend small amounts of planned time socializing with your team members. Be careful not to impinge on their time or waste yours. A thirty second conversation can do wonders for interpersonal rapport but a five minute chat session can degrade efficiency. Protect your schedule. Insist on well run, timely meetings. Focus on your priorities while making a top priority of maintaining a personal connection with your team. If they know you care, they will care when you need them.
  4. Communicate feedback in realtime. Your team needs regular and immediate feedback. This includes public praise for a job well done. It also includes private and direct feedback on unfulfilled expectations with an immediate call to corrective action or a resolution to an expectation that has become unreasonable. DO NOT do negative feedback by email. Back up any positive emailed feedback in person. Real words from a real person mean a thousand times more than an email.
  5. Embrace conflict. Don’t run away from or duck conflict. Hit it head on, in person, and resolve it. Don’t dwell on blame but fairly examine cause and effect and then focus on actions required to resolve the conflict and move forward. Don’t be afraid to apologize or accept responsibility for creating conflicting expectations or misunderstandings. Invite others to suggest ways to improve. Listen and see step #1.

Now go be a better manager. And if you want a better manager, share this or the Forbes article with her or him.